About Sandy Quandt

www.sandykirbyquandt.com

When God Provides

motel no vacancy signThere are dramatic stories of how God provided for someone’s needs when the situation seemed hopeless. 

No food in the cupboard and a bag of groceries appear on the doorstep.

The need for a transplant donor and one becomes available just in time.

Someone knows someone who knows someone and a job is secured before the last penny from the last paycheck has been spent.

While you may have never participanted in anything you’d call dramatic, I’m sure if you look back, you’ll see God’s hand always present, large or small, providing in ways only he can.

A time I feel for certain God provided for my parents, brother, and me was when we traveled back to the States from Panama after visiting Sissy and Chief in the Canal Zone.

The Miami, Florida hotel clerk informed my dad there were no available rooms. It was late, Dad, and the rest of us, were tired after our flight. This wasn’t the first hotel we’d tried to find a room at and the prospects for finding a room for the night did not look good.

As my dad turned away, the hotel clerk called him back. Seems he just so happened to have a room left after all.

Now, I know finding a hotel room does not rank up there with receiving a transplant donor, but the point I’d like to make is this. We need to keep our eyes open to see God’s hand at work in our lives.

There’s also been the time I thought I lost my wallet. Pilot and I looked all over and couldn’t find it. Until…I looked one more time in my purse, of all places, and there it was.

God doesn’t always work in dramatic ways, but he is always at work.

And don’t you think he’d appreciate it if we thanked him for the things we consider small, just as much as we thank him for the things we consider big?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

And this same God who takes care of me will supply all your needs from his glorious riches, which have been given to us in Christ Jesus. Philippians 4:19 (NLT)

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Photo by KEEM IBARRA on Unsplash

The Lines Between Us Book Review

Amy Lynn Green weaves a little known fact from World War II into a story of mystery and intrigue within the pages of The Lines Between Us in a masterful way that keeps the reader turning the page.

Women’s Army Corp PFC Dorie Armitage has no problem with deception and lies. As long as she’s the one handing them out. When her brother Jack is harmed in an accident as a conscientious objector smokejumper volunteer in Oregon, she does whatever it takes to discover the truth of what happened.

The Lines Between Us takes twists and turns as Dorie and her brother’s best friend, Gordon, also a conscientious objector smokejumper, work together to get to the uncomfortable truth of what really happened to Jack.

Filled with an array of interesting historical facts and characters who must make peace with the choices they made, The Lines Between Us is a great read for fans of historical fiction written well.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

It Is Never Too Late To Do God’s Will

older man with sonHave you ever felt like perhaps it’s too late to do God’s will?

In Christine Caine’s book, Unexpected, she relates the story of Caleb, showing it is never too late to do God’s will.

Right now, in this season of my life, I’ve questioned whether it’s time to move on past certain dreams I’ve long held or keep pressing on. Christine’s recounting of Caleb pressing on even into his eighties, proves it’s never too late to pursue the call God has on our life.

We remember Caleb as one of two spies who, along with Joshua, entered the Promised Land, saw the giants, and announced, “No problem. With God on our side, we can take them. Those giants are gonna fall.”

Unfortunately, the people believed the fearful accounts of the other ten spies, refused to take the land, and wandered for another forty years in the wilderness.

Christine says:

During all those wilderness years, he kept believing. And he kept himself vitally alive — spiritually, physically, mentally, and emotionally — eager to possess what God had promised him. Over the course of four decades, he never let go of the promise that Hebron was his. His attitude was all in — he looked to the future with nothing but hope and courage.

Caleb never quit. He refused to allow himself to stop believing he’d reach the Promised Land, even after four decades of trying. He refused to sit back and rest on previous victories. He held firm to the belief it was never too late to see God’s promise fulfilled.

When Caleb was eighty-five years of age, Joshua gave him the land of Hebron as the Lord commanded. But first, Caleb had to drive out three clans of the descendants of Anak. That fierce giant who stopped the Israelites from entering forty years earlier.

Caleb was prepared to take his rightful place in the Promised Land.

He put in the hard work to reach it.

He didn’t give up when opposition pressed against him.

He could have retired and let others fight the battles, but he didn’t.

He fought for his Promised Land.

How willing are we to keep fighting, and truly believe it’s never too late to do God’s will?

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Then Caleb silenced the people before Moses and said, “We should go up and take possession of the land, for we can certainly do it.” Numbers 13:30

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Photo by Nathan Anderson on Unsplash

Walk on Water

row boat on waterAndrew Peterson wrote a song which said, “If you want to walk on water, you’ve got to get out of the boat.” Shortly after, books popped up with the same title, based on the Bible story of Peter walking to Jesus on water.

How many of us would love to have the faith to walk on water? But there’s a catch. In order to walk on water, we’ve got to haul our self out of the safety of the boat. We have to take that first scary step into liquid.

We remember the story of Jesus walking on the water to the disciples’ boat during a storm. At first glance, the disciples believed he was a ghost. When Peter realized it was the Lord, he decided to get out of the boat and walk across the water to him.

All went well until the waves began to lap around Peter’s knees, and he took his eyes off Jesus.

Jesus asked Peter, “Oh, ye of little faith. Why did you doubt?”

Why did he doubt? Why do we doubt? Why was his faith small? Why is our faith small?

In Mark Batterson’s book, The Circle Maker, he says, The key to getting out of the boat is hearing the voice of God. If you’re going to get out of the boat in the middle of a lake in the middle of the night, you better make sure that Jesus said, “Come.” But if Jesus says, “Come,” you better not stay in the boat.

I used to be rather fearless, but I’m not so inclined these days. Decades ago a friend and I climbed up an open look-out tower on a small Native American mound on an island in the middle of the St. John’s River in Florida.

As we approached the top, I stopped and latched onto the metal rail like my life depended on it, bent forward, and waited for the earth to stop shaking. Vertigo, compliments of an inner ear nerve imbalance, gripped my body and I knew for sure I was going to careen to the ground in a broken heap.

My friend looked at me, asked if I was okay, then said, “I’ve never known you to wimp out of anything before.”

Just as my vertigo prevented me from going any further up that ladder to see the view only possible from way above the ground, our fear oftentimes stops us from climbing to the heights Jesus wants us to reach. It freezes us, and keeps us from putting one leg after the other over the side of the boat, and stepping on top of the water.

We wimp out.

Jesus wants us to experience a life of faith in him. He wants us to achieve more than we could ever imagine. He wants us to remember he is right here with us, holding our hand when the waves threaten to pull us under. He wants us to get out of the boat when he says, “Come.”

If we allow fear to keep us in our personal safe boat, we’ll never walk on water.

Are there times you’ve stepped out of the boat in faith, even when you were frightened?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

But Jesus immediately said to them: “Take courage! It is I. Don’t be afraid.”

“Lord, if it’s you,” Peter replied, “tell me to come to you on the water.”

“Come,” he said.

Then Peter got down out of the boat, walked on the water and came toward Jesus. But when he saw the wind, he was afraid and, beginning to sink, cried out, “Lord, save me!”

Immediately Jesus reached out his hand and caught him. “You of little faith,” he said, “why did you doubt?” Matthew 14:27-31 (NIV)

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Photo by Mick Haupt on Unsplash

Gluten-free King Ranch Chicken Recipe

King Ranch ChickenThis gluten-free King Ranch Chicken blends shredded chicken with Rotel tomatoes, cheese, and sour cream to create a wonderful Mexican-flavored dish.

  • 1 pound chicken, chopped
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 1 green bell pepper, diced
  • 10 oz can Rotel tomatoes
  • 8 oz shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 2 Tbsp corn starch
  • 5 cups tortilla chips
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • chili powder

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Chop chicken. Season with chili powder. Brown in hot oil.

Remove chicken from skillet.

Add butter, diced onion, and bell pepper. Soften.

Add chicken broth and simmer.

Mix corn starch in 2 Tbsp water until smooth. Pour mixture into skillet. Stir until thickened.

Drain the tomatoes and add to mixture.

Remove from heat.

Add chicken, sour cream and 1/2 of cheese. Stir well.

Layer tortilla chips and chicken. Top with remaining cheese.

Bake 15 minutes.

Top with green onions and serve.

Enjoy!

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

What To Do With Broken Things?

rocking chair on porchWith all the DIY shows nowadays, I wonder, what to do broken things?

How do you handle the broken things in your life which require repair? Do you throw them away? Put them in the closet, garage, basement, attic and forget about them? Fix them?

I’ve done all of the above. Some of the broken things were able to be repaired. Some weren’t. Some are still waiting.

Before Pie was born, a family friend gave me a small antique reed-bottom rocker. I love love love that chair. After a while though, some of the reeds worked themselves loose. The chair needed to be repaired. The restoration job was done by a professional.

I also have one of my grandfather’s old cane-bottom rockers. The bottom is worn out, and the rocker slats are flat after the many years it sat on my grandparent’s front porch. That rocker is in our garage where it has hung for years.

Like I said, some things get repaired. Some are still waiting.

But what about the brokenness of our lives? What do we do with that? Do we stuff our hurts deep down inside and act like nothing’s wrong? Do we live with the brokenness, allow it to define us, and make us feel unworthy?

Do we rewind the tapes of our failures over and over and over until we believe no one would like us if they really knew what we’d done?

Because God created us, he already knows all about our faults, broken places, and shattered dreams. He wants us to bring all our broken pieces to him. In his hands, God can do the necessary repairs. He’s the restoration professional.

God won’t throw us out. He won’t put us in the basement or attic and forget about us. He will restore us and make us much better than we ever thought possible.

What do you do with the broken things in your life? Hang onto them, hoping to repair them someday, throw them away, or set to work restoring what was broken?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Yet there is one ray of hope: his compassion never ends. It is only the Lord’s mercies that have kept us from complete destruction. Great is his faithfulness; his loving-kindness begins afresh each day. Lamentations 3:21-23 (TLB)

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Cast All Your Worries On Jesus

Guatemalan worry dollsSeveral years ago, I came upon a tiny woven bag which contained six even tinier woven dolls. Guatemalan worry dolls. Worry dolls (also called trouble dolls; in Spanish, Muñeca quitapena) are small, hand-made dolls that originate from Guatemala.

According to legend, Guatemalan children tell their worries to the Worry Dolls, placing them under their pillow when they go to bed at night. By morning the dolls have gifted them with the wisdom and knowledge to eliminate their worries. The worry dolls are made of wire, wool and colorful textile leftovers. The size of the dolls can vary between ½ inch to 2 inches.

The story of the worry doll is a local Mayan legend. The origin of the Muñeca quitapena refers to a Mayan princess named Ixmucane. The princess received a special gift from the sun god that allowed her to solve any problem a human could worry about. The worry doll represents the princess and her wisdom.

Although I’ve had plenty of worries since the day I purchased these dolls, I’ve never once needed to place them under my pillow at night. Why? Because the God who created the heavens and earth cares about me, just as he cares about you. He asks us to cast all our worries on him, for he is always, always, thinking about us, and watching everything that concerns us.

We do not need to limit when we tell Jesus about our concerns and worries to right before we go to sleep as with the Worry Dolls. We can cast all our cares on him 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, believing he hears, cares, and works on our behalf.

With the calm assurance Jesus hears and is working, we can safely rest at night and rise in the morning with the knowledge nothing reaches us that didn’t pass through Christ’s nail-pierced hands first. And when it reaches us, Jesus is right there beside us, walking through whatever it is with us.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Let him have all your worries and cares, for he is always thinking about you and watching everything that concerns you. 1 Peter 5:7 (TLB)

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Awesome!: Exploring the Nature and Names of Jesus Book Review

Awesome! book cover

In Awesome!: Exploring the Nature and Names of Jesus Dick Eastman quotes extensively from a multitude of theologians, Christian leaders, and scripture, to describe who Jesus is. There are seven pages of reference citations. Because of the multiple points of view used throughout, I found it difficult to engage with this book.

Written in a 31-day format, set with a specific nature of Jesus for each day, the chapters conclude with four steps to go deeper in your study. Explore, Experience, Express, and Exalt.

One thing I found useful in Awesome! was the author’s inclusion of 868 names, or expressions, describing Jesus in alphabetical order beginning with A to Z and ending with Zion-Dwelling God.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Pause for Poetry-It Isn’t the Thing You Do, Dear

It Isn’t the Thing You Do, Dear

Adelaide Proctor

It isn’t the things you do, dear

It’s the things you leave undone,

That gives you the bitter heartache

At the setting of the sun;

 

The tender word unspoken,

The letter you did not write,

The flower you might have sent, dear

Are your haunting ghosts at night.

 

The stone you might have lifted

Out of your brother’s way,

The bit of heartfelt counsel

You were hurried too much to say;

 

The loving touch of the hand dear,

The gentle and winsome tone,

That you had no time or thought for,

With troubles enough of your own.

 

These little acts of kindness,

So easily out of mind,

These chances to be angels,

Which even mortals find.

 

They come in nights of silence,

To take away the grief,

When hope is faint and feeble,

And a drought has stopped belief.

 

A life is all too short, dear,

And sorrow is all too great,

To allow our slow compassion

That tarries until too late.

 

And its not the thing you do, dear,

Its the thing you leave undone,

That gives you the bitter heartache,

At the setting sun.

Adelaide Proctor

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think
others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media
buttons.

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Following Rules

The volunteer organization, Civil Air Patrol has three main missions. Aerospace education, cadet programs, and emergency services.

During a meeting, one member brought up the subject of the CAP participants in the field wearing BDUs — Battle Dress Uniforms — which consist of camouflage shirts and pants during deer hunting season.

Excellent point.

Who wants to be dressed in camo, wandering through a field on a rescue mission when you are surrounded by hunters who can’t tell you from a deer?

This man said he has his cadets wear fluorescent ball caps and vest.

Good thinking, I say.

He also said he knew he was breaking the uniform code regulation, and would be reprimanded, but felt it best for his cadets.

Way to go.

Rules or no rules, do what’s right.

No one wants to explain to a parent their child has been injured because a hunter couldn’t tell them from a deer.

Thinking about this man’s refusal to follow a rule he felt would endanger those in his care led me to ponder several other instances where people refused to follow certain rules.

  • During his interactions with the Pharisees, Jesus often called them vipers, white-washed tombs full of dead men’s bones, and blind guides. The Pharisees prided themselves in following the man-made rules they created, yet they did not follow God’s rules. Jesus refused to go along with them.
  • Previously, I wrote about the Apostle John’s refusal to follow the Jewish religious restriction that prohibited him from entering Pilot’s courts during Christ’s arrest.
  • Henry D. Thoreau often practiced Civil Disobedience. (As did Ghandi and Martin Luther King, Jr.) At one point while Thoreau was in jail for refusing to follow rules he felt were unjust, his good friend, Ralph W. Emerson, visited Thoreau. Emerson asked Thoreau what he was doing “in there”. Thoreau turned the question around and asked Emerson what are you doing “out there”.

At one point, Jesus was asked which was the greatest commandment, or rule. He answered by saying we are to love the LORD our God with all our heart, soul, strength, and mind. And to love our neighbor as our self.

As long as we live there will always be rules. If our desire is to become more and more like Christ each and every day, our job, I believe, is to pray for discernment to know which rules he wants us to follow. And which ones he wants us to ignore.

Any rules you’ve felt led to ignore? Besides posted speed limit signs? 😉

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

One of the teachers of the law came and heard them debating. Noticing that Jesus had given them a good answer, he asked him, “Of all the commandments, which is the most important?”

“The most important one,” answered Jesus, “is this: ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.” Mark 12:28-31 (NIV)

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Photo by Vlad Sabila on Unsplash