Always We Begin Again Book Review

Always We Begin Again by Leeana Tankersley is a book of 100 short meditations on life experiences. On her first page she credits the Rule of Saint Benedict as a lifeline; Always we begin again, stating Benedict’s rule for monks called to the holiness of repetition, even the spiritual efficacy of it, giving a certain grace to beginnings.

In several meditations Leeana calls those distractions or things which want to paralyze, shame, suffocate, embarrass, and silence us Soul Bullies. I like that term. In talking about these bullies, she says although the Soul Bullies will never fully go away, we have the power by the grace of God to put them in their place, remembering there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ. Reminding us, we can begin again.

While discussing the subject of waiting she writes, “Sometimes it’s OK to just not know, to not know the end from the beginning, to not understand how we’re going to get there from here.” Then she concludes by saying if we could see the answer from here, we wouldn’t need God.

Much to think about in Always We Begin Again.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

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I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

The Most Important Stories of the Bible Book Review

The Most Important Stories of the Bible by Christopher Hudson and Stan Campbell is a wonderful book. In 182 pages it takes the reader through the Bible, highlighting stories in sections titled Beginnings, Patriarchs, Israel’s Family Becomes a Nation, Kings and Prophets, Stories of Jesus, and Stories of the Early Church.

Each chapter begins where the previous chapter left off, giving a brief synopsis before going into The Essential Story for that section of Scripture. Here the authors explain the story in concise, understandable language. The last section of each chapter ends with Essential Truth which is the takeaway from the story.

When I first received this book, I looked up several familiar stories to see how the authors handled them before reading the rest of the book. I came away from each story impressed by the way they were presented.

Is there someone in your life with whom you want to share the essential truth of God’s Word? Someone who maybe isn’t interested in reading the whole Bible? Someone who prefers summaries instead of the entire story? Then The Most Important Stories of the Bible is a book I highly recommend.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

Very Best, Hands-On, Kinda Dangerous Family Devotions Book Review

Very Best, Hands-On, Kinda Dangerous Family Devotions by Tim Shoemaker is not your typical devotional book. It’s kid friendly, way cool, and a kinda dangerous fun way to share spiritual messages with kids of any age.

Pilot and I are fortunate to have first-hand experience with some of Tim’s devotions. Let me tell you, once you’ve seen him use a leaf blower to unroll toilet paper to prove a biblical point of walking in the Spirit versus living in our own power, your life will never be the same. Or a devotion using a dry ice frozen hot dog to teach about hard hearts.

I wish this book was around when Pie was growing up. I’d love to have used these devotions. Well. Maybe not the one using raw hamburger if you didn’t have the preferred fresh road kill. Or the one Tim admits setting paper on fire – twice – during the demonstration. Or electrocuting a pickle which came with six safety precautions. Maybe not those devotions.

Disclaimer. Pilot and I know Tim, so had to laugh while reading his caution warnings regarding certain devotions. Things like, “When I get a flame, I stop the microwave immediately, open the door, and blow it out. Kids love seeing the flame, but you don’t have to let it go that far.” With the additional reminder to keep a bucket of water handy. Don’t you love it?

If you have children, grandchildren or know a child, pick up a copy of Very Best, Hands-On, Kinda Dangerous Family Devotions for each of their families. You won’t regret it. Besides delivering unforgettable visual demonstrations, you’ll also deliver unforgettable Biblical truths through each devotion.

But don’t forget the safety goggles, sheets of thick plastic, and buckets of water. 🙂

Anyone up for launching baking potatoes through a PVC pipe to demonstrate the destructive effects of uncontrolled anger? Or dropping watermelons out a two-story window to show some things are worth holding onto?

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

The Number of Love Book Review

Set in 1917 Europe, The Number of Love  by Roseanna M. White tells the story of codebreaker Margot De Wilde and field agent Drake Elton, who operate within England’s intelligence network during World War I. Filled with well-developed heroes and villains, The Number of Love is a well-researched book of espionage, intrigue, and heartbreak. The author skillfully intersects fact with fiction in the telling of Margot and Drake’s story.

Within the pages of this story, readers catch a glimpse of the lives of those who used numbers to break coded German messages, along with those in the field who risked their lives to intercept those messages through the work of Margot and Drake.

Twists and turns run throughout this Christian historical romance to the very end as the author weaves history, romance, and faith throughout the book for a satisfying conclusion.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

Women Who Met Jesus

In her book, The Women Who Met Jesus, Dorothy Valcárcel compares her life struggles, and the struggles of those around her, with struggles she believes women who met Jesus struggled with. Through these encounters with Christ, the author sets out to show how just as Jesus met these women’s needs long ago, he continues to meet our needs today.

Before beginning, the author states the women in her book didn’t get to the point of transformation by reading self-help books or by following the latest advice fad. She says each woman began the healing process when she met Jesus.

While I didn’t always see the connection the author tried to make, or agree with the label she placed on each woman to identify their need, I understand her point that Jesus meets each of us where we are in the middle of our need and guides us toward the path he has for us.

Each chapter ends with several sets of questions for self-reflection.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.