Half the Battle: Healing Your Hidden Hurts Book Review

As is true with most things, there are good and not so good. I found this to be the case with Half the Battle: Healing Your Hidden Hurts by Dr. Jon Chasteen.

First the good.

Dr. Chasteen points out most of us are engaged in a battle of some kind, saying we all have hurts and wounds. Before we fight external battles, he says we must fight the internal battles we hide and cover up.

He states the only way to truly rid ourselves of the shame and guilt of these hidden wounds is to invite God into them, allow him to take his knife to the wound, and let him remove it.

The majority of the book talks about wounded, rejected people. In the final chapters Dr. Chasteen compares the World War I and the story of Gideon to facing our battles today in the light of Jesus as our guide, in the unity of believers, and with praise.

There is a study guide at the back of the book with additional questions for consideration.

Now the not so good.

I found the way the author wandered back and forth through various scriptures to prove his point extremely disjointed and distracting.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Blog About Bloggers Network for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave. Leave a comment between October 8, 2020 and October 14, 2020 for an opportunity to receive a free copy of the book. Winner will be notified by October 20, 2020.

You can find my October Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Prevail Book Review

Beginning with Genesis 12:7 and ending with Revelation 22:12-13, Prevail: 365 Days of Enduring Strength from God’s Word by Susie Larson gives readers exactly what the title promises; enduring strength from God’s word.

Reading Prevail is like talking with a trusted friend about your problems, fears, and doubts, knowing she will point you to God’s truths without the least bit of ridicule or condemnation.

Although I appreciate the way Prevail works its way sequentially through the Bible, I especially appreciate the Table of Contents which lists each devotion by subject. I find that helpful when looking for a devotion that addresses a specific need.

Each devotion has a highlighted verse, meaningful commentary of the Scripture that speaks to the reader in a personable, encouraging way, and points the reader to God. This is followed by the Scripture reference the devotion came from for further study, an application statement, and short prayer. The pages are beautiful. Swirls of varying pastels adorn each page. I found that soothing.

I highly recommend Prevail: 365 Days of Enduring Strength from God’s Word for those seeking more from their daily devotional.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Bethany House for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.

Fascinating Bible Studies on Every Parable Book Review

In the introduction to his book, Fascinating Bible Studies on Every Parable, Dr. William H. Marty states the purpose for the book is to help readers understand Jesus’ parables–what Jesus intended to teach, and the response he expected–and then to suggest how we can apply Christ’s parables to our lives today. I found this book easy to digest and absorb without being simplistic. While we may be familiar with Jesus’ parables, there is always something new to consider in reading them.

In short, concise chapters for each parable, Dr. Marty does just that. He lists the Bible reference for the parable, gives his takeaway in one short sentence, explains the parable in its historical and cultural setting, and ends with questions for reflection related to the parable. The parables are organized into two broad categories. The nature of the kingdom, and the ethics of the kingdom.

Dr. Marty believes in reading a parable, we should first consider what the story meant to Jesus’ audience, not to those of us who live in twentieth century America. Good advice. He also states the purpose of Jesus’ parables was not to entertain, but to challenge and impress on his followers the need to change their mindset about how they related to God and others. More good advice.

You can find my September Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.

An Appalachian Summer Book Review

An Appalachian Summer by Ann H. Gabhart, set in Appalachian Kentucky during the Depression of 1933, is a wonderful book filled with relatable characters who face challenges without giving up.

Piper Danson is faced with deciding whether she should go along with her father’s decision she marry a man she’s not met before to secure her financial future, or marry the man she has loved since they were children with little prospect of financial support.

To give herself time and space to think without either of the men around, Piper leaves her home with all its comforts in Louisville to volunteer as a Frontier Nursing horseback courier in the mountains where comforts as she’s known them are replaced with an awareness of God’s beauty and presence.

An Appalachian Summer skillfully draws readers into the world of the Frontier Nurses, the couriers, and the people of the mountains, presenting each as an individual with hopes, dreams, needs, and resilience.

I highly recommend this book for those who want to read a heartfelt story well told.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

You can find my July Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.

What Momma Left Behind Book Review

With the authentic voice of an Appalachian storyteller, Cindy Sproles’ novel, What Momma Left Behind, takes you to 1877 Tennessee with all its heartache and promise. With that said, if you are unfamiliar with Appalachian expressions and dialect, you may find What Momma Left Behind somewhat confusing to get through.

This is a story of loss, love, sacrifice, and eventually, forgiveness, as we journey with seventeen-year-old Worie Dressar following the death of her mother at a time when disease spreads through her mountain community, killing parents and leaving orphans to fend for themselves.

While there is much to like about this book, I came away with unanswered questions I wish the author answered.

If you enjoy reading Christian historical fiction written in an authentic Appalachian voice, What Momma Left Behind just might be the book for you.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

You can find my June Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.