Calm in the Storm

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

December 5th I had outpatient surgery to remove a cyst from my right hand. Although the hand surgery was expected, and one of the easiest surgeries I’ve undergone, no one expected the cyst to be infected. That led to a more involved recovery with greater limitations post-op for an extended period of time.

Two days after that surgery, I was on a gurney in the back of an ambulance on my way to the emergency room for overnight observation for a possible heart attack, with stress test the next morning.

Thankfully, everything turned out fine on all fronts, but this was not the best way to enter the Christmas season.

Something I learned during these two events is when we plan on one thing and something else altogether different develops, it’s possible the most simple words to familiar songs or Bible verses we committed to memory can become difficult to recall.

During the very restless night I spent in the emergency room with telemetry monitor leads adhered to my body, and my recently operated on hand in an unwieldy huge nearly three foot tall foam box-thing, whenever the nurse came in every four hours to stick another needle into yet another uncooperative vein, he told me over and over, “You have GOT to calm down.”

Yeah. Easy for him to say.

Unfortunately, the stress of the surgery and hospital visit caused all my autoimmune diseases to go berserk and flare like mad.

Even so, shouldn’t I have been able to calm down? Wasn’t Jesus right there with me whether I remembered all the words to the songs I tried to sing, or the verses I tried to repeat?

Of course he was.

But for me, at that point in time, I was in a very real tug of war with fear, and fear was threatening to win.

When I realized all I could do was say one word, I realized that one word was enough.

Jesus. Jesus. Jesus.

Over and over and over.

These two situations weren’t what I expected, but you know what? They didn’t surprise God one little bit. And none of your unexpected situations surprise him, either.

The God who is not bound by time like we are still sits on his throne. He is still in control. The wind and the rain and uncooperative veins still obey his commands, even when the only thing we can do is whisper the precious name of his son.

Jesus.

When you find yourself in unexpected situations you didn’t see coming, situations where you know for a fact Jesus is standing there holding you close, but you can’t quite shake the cloud that’s settling over you, how do you get to the other side of it?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

This is my command—be strong and courageous! Do not be afraid or discouraged. For the Lord your God is with you wherever you go. Joshua 1:9 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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[bctt tweet=”The God who is not bound by time, like we are, still sits on his throne. He is still in control. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

God Still Sits on His Throne

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

December 5th I had outpatient surgery to remove a cyst from my right hand. Although the hand surgery was expected, and one of the easiest surgeries I’ve undergone, no one expected the cyst to be infected. That led to a more involved recovery with greater limitations post-op for an extended period of time.

Two days after that surgery, I was on a gurney in the back of an ambulance on my way to the emergency room for overnight observation for a possible heart attack, with stress test the next morning.

Thankfully, everything turned out fine on all fronts, but this was not the best way to enter the Christmas season.

Something I learned during these two events is when we plan on one thing and something else altogether different develops, it’s possible the most simple words to familiar songs or Bible verses we committed to memory can become difficult to recall.

During the very restless night I spent in the emergency room with telemetry monitor leads adhered to my body, and my recently operated on hand in an unwieldy huge nearly three foot tall foam box-thing, whenever the nurse came in every four hours to stick another needle into yet another uncooperative vein, he told me over and over, “You have GOT to calm down.”

Yeah. Easy for him to say.

Unfortunately, the stress of the surgery and hospital visit caused all my autoimmune diseases to go berserk and flare like mad.

Even so, shouldn’t I have been able to calm down? Wasn’t Jesus right there with me whether I remembered all the words to the songs I tried to sing, or the verses I tried to repeat?

Of course he was.

But for me, at that point in time, I was in a very real tug of war with fear, and fear was threatening to win.

When I realized all I could do was say one word, I realized that one word was enough.

Jesus. Jesus. Jesus.

Over and over and over.

These two situations weren’t what I expected, but you know what? They didn’t surprise God one little bit. And none of your unexpected situations surprise him, either.

The God who is not bound by time like we are still sits on his throne. He is still in control. The wind and the rain and uncooperative veins still obey his commands, even when the only thing we can do is whisper the precious name of his son.

Jesus.

When you find yourself in unexpected situations you didn’t see coming, situations where you know for a fact Jesus is standing there holding you close, but you can’t quite shake the cloud that’s settling over you, how do you get to the other side of it?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

This is my command—be strong and courageous! Do not be afraid or discouraged. For the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.  Joshua 1:9 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”The God who is not bound by time, like we are, still sits on his throne. He is still in control. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — The King’s Table

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

After David became king of the united tribes of Israel, he wondered if any of Saul’s family remained he could show kindness. That in itself was a shock to those who understood how the succession to a throne usually went.

No new king looked for his rival’s family members to show them kindness. They looked for family members to eliminate.

You see, David made a promise to one of Saul’s sons, Jonathan. He and David were best buds. Jonathan knew God choose David over him to become king when Saul died. He didn’t try to get in the way of God’s plan. In fact, Jonathan risked his life at the hands of his father’s wrath to protect David. Because of that, David was determined to keep his promise to protect Jonathan’s family.

As it turned out, there was a son of Jonathan’s, Mephibosheth, still alive. David sent for Mephibosheth. Understandably, when he arrived at the palace in front of the king, Mephibosheth expected the worse. As he had every right to expect.

But David told him not to be afraid. He wanted to show kindness to Mephibosheth because of his friendship with Jonathan. He restored everything that belonged to Mephibosheth’s grandfather, Saul, and told Mephibosheth from that day forward, he would live in David’s palace and eat at the king’s table as if he were one of David’s sons.

Amazing.

When I think of this story, which I absolutely love, I connect the image of Mephibosheth eating at the king’s table, with The King’s table which is prepared for us by our Good Shepherd, Jesus Christ. Our Shepherd prepares a table before us in the presence of our enemies.

I imagine sitting at the king’s table, and eating with David’s sons, made Mephibosheth believe he sat in the presence of his enemies. I doubt David’s sons, especially Absolom and Amnon, were pleased to have Saul’s grandson treated like one of them.

What others thought didn’t matter. David was king. He invited Mephibosheth to eat at his table, and Mephibosheth would eat at the king’s table.

We have a place at the table Jesus prepares for us. He is King. He’s the one in charge. If he believes us worthy enough to eat in his presence, no enemy can keep us from pulling up a seat.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

“Don’t be afraid!” David said. “I intend to show kindness to you because of my promise to your father, Jonathan. I will give you all the property that once belonged to your grandfather Saul, and you will eat here with me at the king’s table!” 2 Samuel 9:7 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”After David became king of the united tribes of Israel, he wondered if any of Saul’s family remained he could show kindness.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Don’t Ignore the Prompt

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Have there been times in your life where out of the blue someone’s name flashes across your mind?

What about situations where you find yourself in a conversation with a stranger, and feel it wasn’t a coincidence?

Some might call situations like those Divine Promptings.

So let’s say a friend’s name does cross our mind unexpectedly. What should we do about it? We can ignore it, send up a prayer for them, call and check up on them …

We can do a lot of things, but in situations like that, my default is to send up a prayer, whether I have any idea what’s going on in that person’s life at that particular point in time, or not.

God knows, and he just might have put that prompt into our brains for a definite reason.

What about times where we have a conversation we weren’t intending to have?

This happens to me often. More times than not, it’s with a stranger. Don’t know what it is about me. Maybe I appear approachable, or maybe it’s another God prompt.

For those of you reading this who may not know me personally, I am not overly outgoing. Quite the opposite. I’m a shy introvert. I’m more of an observer than a conversationalist.

Go figure how I ended up a teacher.

I know I’ve been on the receiving end of others’ prayers on my behalf when they had no idea what was going on in my life, but prayed for me or my family anyway.

I imagine you have to, even if you don’t know it.

Prayer is a privilege allowing us to go before the very throne of God with petitions and request not just for ourselves, but for others.

How amazing is that?

Because we have this amazing privilege, I believe we should take advantage of it, especially when we feel God’s prompt, and bring our requests daily. Don’t you?

Especially those prayers that seem to come to us out of the blue.

At those times when a friend’s name comes to mind, don’t ignore the nudge. It just might be God prompting us to pray.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Then the religious leaders and Levites stood and prayed that good would come to the people. And their voice was heard. Their prayer came to the Lord’s holy place in heaven. 2 Chronicles 30:27 (NLV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”At those times when a friend’s name comes to mind, don’t ignore the nudge. It just might be God’s prompt to pray for them. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Mercy and Grace

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Mercy and grace. We hear those words often. They are quite similar, yet different.

Miriam-Webster dictionary defines mercy as:

1a : compassion or forbearance shown especially to an offender or to one subject to one’s power also : lenient or compassionate treatment

b : imprisonment rather than death imposed as penalty for first-degree murder

2a : a blessing that is an act of divine favor or compassion

b : a fortunate circumstance

3 : compassionate treatment of those in distress

It defines grace as:

1a : unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification

b : a virtue coming from God

c : a state of sanctification enjoyed through divine assistance

Years ago one of my ministers explained mercy and grace this way.

We’re speeding down the road and get pulled over by a police officer. We deserve a ticket, but instead, the officer gives us a warning.

That’s mercy.

Not getting what we deserve.

Before the officer leaves the side of our car, however, the officer pulls out two sought-after tickets to our favorite event.

That’s grace.

Getting something we don’t deserve.

Jesus told a parable on mercy and grace in his story about the unforgiving servant.

The servant owed a great deal of money to the king, but begged for mercy when the king ordered the man, his wife, his children, and all he had be sold to repay the debt. The servant fell on his knees begging for mercy, promising to pay back all he owed.

The king in his mercy and grace took pity on the servant and forgave him his debt.

But when the servant left the king’s presence, he came upon an acquaintance who owed him a mere pittance. He demanded the friend pay back the money right away.

The friend begged for mercy, asked for patience, and said he would pay back the debt. The ungrateful servant who had been forgiven much, refused. He had his friend who owed him little thrown into debtor’s prison until the debt was paid.

When the king heard of this, he called the wicked servant to appear before him. He reminded the servant, he expected him to give mercy as he’d been given mercy.

In anger the king turned the servant over to the jailers to be tortured until the servant could repay the enormous debt he owed.

God poured his mercy and his grace upon us when he allowed his son, Jesus, to take on the sins of the world and die in our place. Jesus paid the debt we owed but could never pay.

Just like the king in Christ’s parable, because God has shown us mercy and grace, he expects us to be merciful and gracious to others in return.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Then the king called in the man he had forgiven and said, ‘You evil servant! I forgave you that tremendous debt because you pleaded with me. Shouldn’t you have mercy on your fellow servant, just as I had mercy on you?’ Then the angry king sent the man to prison to be tortured until he had paid his entire debt.

 “That’s what my heavenly Father will do to you if you refuse to forgive your brothers and sisters from your heart.” Matthew 18:32-35 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”God poured his mercy and his grace upon us when he allowed his son, Jesus, to take on the sins of the world and die in our place. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]