The Fight for the Right to Vote

One hundred years ago on this day, August 18, 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution granted American women the right to vote with three fourths of the states ratifying the amendment. Some say women were given the right to vote, but from all I’ve seen and researched, women’s suffrage was a hard fought battle. Nothing given in that.

Granted … Achieved, maybe … But not given.

And just because a law is written, that does not mean it will be applied. After the Nineteenth Amendment was ratified in 1920 although some Black women voted in elections and held political offices, many States implemented their own methods to keep them from voting. Many were told they had to pay a poll tax, or there was some other new kind of rule that prevented them from voting.

It took over 60 years for the remaining states to ratify the 19th Amendment after it passed in 1920. Mississippi was the last to do so on March 22, 1984, even though the Voting Rights Act which passed on August 6, 1965 granted full suffrage.

In 1848 the movement for women’s rights-not just the right to vote-launched on a national level with the Seneca Falls Convention organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott. Following the convention, Susan B. Anthony joined the fight. In the 1900s the list included Harriott Stanton Blatch, Alice Paul, Lucy Burns, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Carrie Catt, and many many more.

Through the years many brave women sacrificed much to ensure women today can take part in the democratic process and vote. It was a hard-fought win. One, in truth, I am not really sure I could have fought to the degree these Suffragists fought.

I’m not sure I would have the courage to be one of the silent sentinels who protested through all kinds of weather, knowing they faced ridicule, verbal and physical abuse, arrest for peacefully protesting, fines and imprisonment in Occoquan Workhouse, some women for up to seven months.

While in Occoquan, I would not want my arms chained over my head, eat a meal which typically consisted of wormy bread, raw salt pork, and watered down soup which had worms floating in it.

Nor would I want to be force-fed a raw egg concoction through a tube pushed down my throat or nose during hunger strikes.

While there is much to admire, as with most things when you dig deep enough, cracks appear. Women’s Suffrage is no exception.

There was infighting and divisions as is to be expected with any group, but what shook me from my naive impression of a grand movement is the fact concessions were made to advance the cause leaving some behind.

It wasn’t all Mrs. Banks in Mary Poppins singing Sister Suffragrette, that’s for sure.

Black suffragists were sidelined from the mainstream suffrage movement by its leaders who feared alienating white women, and losing support in the South.

During the spectacular 1913 women’s suffrage parade in Washington, D.C, the organizers ordered Black participants to march at the end of the parade, while other participants marched under their state banner.

Refusing to be separated from her sister Illinoisans, and pushed to the back of the parade, Ida B. Wells-Barnett marched under her home state of Illinois’ banner that day. She told the organizers, “Either I go with you or not at all. I am not taking this stand because I personally wish for recognition. I am doing it for the future benefit of my whole race.”

By the summer of 1920, thirty-five states ratified the amendment. However, one more state was still needed for ratification.

The Tennessee legislature gathered to vote. With the vote tied at forty-eight, the outcome rested on twenty-four-year-old Harry Burn, the state’s youngest representative.

Shortly before voting to break the tie began, Mr. Burn received word from his mother. She asked him to be a good boy and vote for suffrage.

Burn who previously voted against, changed his vote and voted for. The final tally that day was 49 to 47.

With that, the Nineteenth Amendment passed and was ratified.

On November 2 of that same year, more than eight million women across the U.S. voted in elections for the first time.

This November 3rd women across the United States of America are among those who have the right, and dare I say obligation, to vote.

As we exercise our right to vote, let’s not take lightly the valiant fight generations of women who went before us fought to make sure our voices are heard.

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Stop imitating the ideals and opinions of the culture around you, but be inwardly transformed by the Holy Spirit through a total reformation of how you think. This will empower you to discern God’s will as you live a beautiful life, satisfying and perfect in his eyes. Romans 12:2 (TPT)

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Pause for Poetry-But God

But God

Annie Johnson Flint

I know not, but God knows;
Oh, blessed rest from fear!
All my unfolding days
To Him are plain and clear.

Each anxious, puzzled “Why?”
From doubt or dread that grows,
Finds answer in this thought;
I know not, but He knows.

I cannot, but God can;
Oh, balm for all my care!
The burden that I drop
His hand will lift and bear,

Though eagle pinions tire —
I walk where once I ran —
This is my strength, to know
I cannot, but God can.

I see not, but God sees;
Oh, all-sufficient light!
My dark and hidden way
To Him is always bright.

My strained and peering eyes
May close in restful ease,
And I in peace may sleep;
I see not, but He sees.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Suppose

When I was in third grade, I participated in group piano lessons after school. We used wooden keyboards, which made absolutely no sense at all to my way of thinking. How were you supposed to know if you played the correct note when you sat there hitting a piece of wood made to look like a piano? That keyboard didn’t fool me.

As our end of year recital approached, the teacher told each student to bring a piece of sheet music for her approval of the song we would learn, memorize, and play. Well. I couldn’t figure out what to play. Especially since my piano proficiency was rather lacking.

My Aunt Docia in Kentucky learned of my dilemma and sent music she thought would be a good fit. It helped that Aunt Docia was a piano teacher. The piece she sent was called, “Suppose”.

I don’t remember a whole lot about the piece other than it was simple. Yay. It had words such as clouds, puppies, and kittens, I think. When I showed the music to my piano teacher, it met with her approval. Another Yay.

Although I don’t remember the words to the song, I do remember. to this day decades later, what one fellow student said–a girl whose name I don’t recall. “Suppose you can’t learn the song in time.” Bwahahaha.

I may have stuck my tongue out at her.

I probably stuck my tongue out at her.

I learned the song and though nervous beyond words during the recital, managed to play “Suppose”, and get off the stage without fainting. Or throwing up.

The catalyst for this post about “Suppose” is a devotion I read in Streams in the Desert by Hannah Whitall Smith. Ms. Smith described a joyful woman who worked hard to earn a meager living. One day another woman approached her and said, “I understand your happiness today, but I would think your future prospects would sober you. Suppose, for instance, you experience a time of illness and are unable to work. Or suppose your present employers move away, and you cannot find work elsewhere. Or suppose… ”

To which the joyful woman replied, “Stop! I never suppose. The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not be in want. And besides, it’s all that supposing that’s making you so miserable. You’d better give that up and simply trust the Lord.”

Wise advice, don’t you agree?

What say we quit with the suppose, and trust the Lord knows what he’s doing.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Don’t be obsessed with getting more material things. Be relaxed with what you have. Since God assured us, “I’ll never let you down, never walk off and leave you,” we can boldly quote, God is there, ready to help; I’m fearless no matter what. Who or what can get to me? Hebrews 13:5-6 (GNT)

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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All the Parts and Pieces

Perhaps you’ve watched compilation virtual videos (I’m sure there’s a specific name for this, but that’s what I’m going with) during this time of social isolation, where people sing or play instruments at their homes. The video combines all the parts and pieces and shows everyone singing/playing together on the screen at one time. Pretty amazing.

Each separate part is essential to create a complete picture. By themselves, the voice or instrument is only a small piece of many which combines to create a whole.

As I considered this, I thought of all the tiny parts and pieces of our days, our lives, which look insignificant or minor in the grand scheme of things. However, when we allow some distance between those events and look over the past, we can see how God used those small parts and pieces to bring us to where we are today. In the process, creating a masterpiece which required every one of those parts.

Even the hard, wish it never happened thank you very much, parts.

At the end of the book of Genesis we read the story of Joseph. An excellent example of a life full of parts and pieces which looked anything but good. Yet, through God’s sovereignty and grace, turned out better than imagined. For what man planned for evil, God used for good.

Yeah. There are parts and pieces in my life I shook my head at, wondered about how any good could possibly come from then, and asked God what the deal was. If I really take the time and look back over these places, I see how each separate part was essential to create a complete picture. Much like a virtual choir. Or a teenager sold into slavery by his older brothers and later rose to second in command in Egypt.

How do you view all the varied parts and pieces of your life? As random events which mean little in the grand scheme of things or as part of a masterpiece being created by a sovereign God?

“God meant it unto good” — O blest assurance,
Falling like sunshine all across life’s way,
Touching with Heaven’s gold, earth’s darkest storm clouds,
Bringing fresh peace and comfort day by day.

‘Twas not by chance the hands of faithless brothers
Sold Joseph captive to a foreign land;
Nor was it chance that, after years of suffering,
Brought him before the Pharaoh’s throne to stand.

One Eye-all-seeing saw the need of thousands,
And planned to meet it through that one lone soul;
And through the weary days of prison bondage
Was working toward the great and glorious goal.

As yet the end was hidden from the captive,
The iron entered even to his soul;
His eye could scan the present path of sorrow,
Not yet his gaze might rest up in the whole.

Faith failed not through those long, dark days of waiting,
His trust in God was reimbursed at last,
The moments came when God led forth His servant,
To comfort many, all his sufferings past.

“It was not you but God, that led me to here,”
Witnessed triumphant faith in later days;
“God meant it unto good,” no other reason
Mingled their discord with his song of praise.

“God means it unto good” for you, beloved,
The God of Joseph is the same today;
His love permits afflictions, strange and bitter,
His hand is guiding through the unknown way.

Your Lord, who sees the end from the beginning,
Has purposes for you of love untold,
Then place your hand in His and follow fearless,
Till you the riches of His grace behold.

Then, when you stand firm in the Home of glory,
And all life’s paths lie open to your gaze,
Your eyes will SEE the hand that you’re now trusting,
And magnify His love through endless days.

Freda Hanbury Allen

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

So we are convinced that every detail of our lives is continually woven together to fit into God’s perfect plan of bringing good into our lives, for we are his lovers who have been called to fulfill his designed purpose. Romans 8:28 (TPT)

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Gluten-free Cabbage Patch Stew Recipe

I adapted this yummy gluten-free Cabbage Patch Stew recipe from Blind Pig and the Acorn. Pilot made dumplings to go with it, but we decided it’s better without them.

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped cabbage
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 16 oz stewed tomatoes
  • 15 1/2 oz kidney, OR black beans
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoons chili powder

Cook and stir ground beef in Dutch oven until brown. Drain

Add onions, cabbage, and celery. Cook and stir until vegetables are light brown.

Stir in tomatoes, beans (with liquid), water, salt, pepper, and chili powder.

Heat to boiling. Reduce heat.

Cook uncovered over low heat 10 minutes.

Cover and cook an additional 10 minutes.

Enjoy!

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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