Silencing Insecurity Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

In Donna Gibbs’ book, Silencing Insecurity, she exposes the thieves of our identity, uncovers the problems those thieves leave behind, and looks at the messes individuals in Scripture found themselves in because of identity theft.

As a licensed Christian counselor, Donna wrote Silencing Insecurity from that point of view. It is not a quick or easy read you can skim over and expect to understand. It is a book that needs to be read thoughtfully to obtain the encouragement and guidance each page holds. Because psychology is an interest of mine, this was not a problem for me. For others, it might be.

The first part of the book covers typical things that impact our sense of identity and looks at how Satan works hard to steal from us.

The second section explores how false beliefs create unnecessary challenges regarding our mind, emotions, and relationships, as well as spirituality and life development.

The final section centers on the Audience of One – God. It shows why he is worthy of our dependence and is the one who defines our identity.

Each chapter contains a set of questions at the end for personal reflection and application. Like I mentioned earlier, if you are serious about working through issues which push you toward feelings of insecurity, you shouldn’t rush through these.

The appendix contains four pages of Scripture Truths for a Secure Identity for when you experience rejection, feel unworthy or not good enough, feel shame or regret your past, feel all alone, are overwhelmed, feel broken, fear the future, or when you need to be reminded you are free.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Revell provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”In Donna Gibbs’ book, Silencing Insecurity, she exposes identity thieves, uncovers problems thieves leave behind, and looks at scriptural victims of thieft. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Crack Yourself Up Jokes for Kids Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Crack Yourself Up Jokes for Kids by Sandy Silverthorne is written for the 6-12 year old range. So why, you might ask, would I request this 138 page gem from Revell? Because sometimes, you just need to read something that brings a smile to your face, and a giggle to your lips. And that’s exactly what this book of jokes, riddles, and puns does. It reminds me of the days Pie and I read similar books, and groaned over the corniness of it all when he was in elementary school. Perfect.

Do you like jokes? Here’s one for you.

A dad and his son were out driving.

Dad: Oh no! I just went through that stop sign.

Son: Don’t worry. The police car behind us did the same thing.

Here’s a riddle for you.

Q: What would happen if you threw blue tennis into the Red sea?

A: They’d get wet.

Or how about books found in Emily Biddle’s Bookmobile such as Why Christy Walked to School by Mr. Buss.

Crack Yourself Up Jokes for Kids is a fun, quick read children will love and read over and over and over.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Revell provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”Crack Yourself Up Jokes for Kids, written for 6-12 year olds, is a fun, quick read children will love and read over and over and over. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

The Crescent Stone Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

In The Crescent Stone, a young adult fantasy, author Matt Mikalotos tells the tale of Madeline, a girl with a terminal lung disease, her friend, Jason, the Elenil, Scim, and Black Skulls in the Sunlit Lands. A land where everything is not what it seems, and comes at a price Madeline and Jason never imagined.

Offered the ability to breathe in exchange for a year’s service to the Elenil, Madeline agrees to go to the Sunlit Lands. Not wanting his friend to travel alone, Jason strikes a bargain which allows him to accompany her.

With twist and turns up to the very last page, The Crescent Stone winds its way through a fantastical land with fantastical characters as it unravels Madeline’s story to the reader.

The Crescent Stone is populated with a wonderful diverse cast of likeable characters. While I agree understanding our history helps us make sense of our present, to me, the author’s repeated recounting of the past wrongs inflicted on multiple ethnic groups at the hands of the privileged stopped the flow of Madeline’s story.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Tyndale provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”With twist and turns up to the very last page, The Crescent Stone winds its way through a fantastical land with fantastical characters as it unravels Madeline’s story to the reader.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

The Mad Wolf’s Daughter Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

The Mad Wolf’s Daughter, Diane Magras’ middle grade Scottish medieval adventure for 9-12 year olds, is not the typical book you’ve seen reviewed on this blog. So, as Monty Python would say … Now for something completely different …

I truly loved this book. It’s a fun read with wonderful, well-rounded characters and witty dialog set in Scotland during the days of knights, quests, castles, treachery, rescue, war-bands, and witches. The witches are actually healers until something goes wrong.

After her father and brothers are captured by the lord’s knights, pre-teen Drest is left all alone. Alone, except for the knight, Emerick, someone from his group from the castle tossed over a cliff and into the ravine.

The youngest of her family, Drest has never fought in battle before. She’s only heard the tales her brothers told. But now she must use every bit of skill to rescue her family. Taking the wounded knight captive as a trade for her da and brothers, if indeed he’ll keep his word about the trade, seems the best way to rescue her loved ones.

The Mad Wolf’s daughter must reach the castle before her family hangs in four days. Of course, the way is filled with peril, and villagers tell Drest things which cause her to question some of the Mad Wolf’s war-band’s tactics.

Perhaps this is not a book for you, but it just might be the book for someone you know who is between the ages of 9 and 12, or someone who enjoys fun adventurous reads with witty dialog and likeable characters.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

[bctt tweet=”The Mad Wolf’s Daughter, Diane Magras’ middle grade Scottish medieval adventure for 9-12 year olds, is not the usual type book you’ve seen me review on this blog. So, as Monty Python would say … Now for something completely different …” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Together Forever Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

In Together Forever, Jody Hedlund’s second book in her Orphan Train series set in 1858, Marianne Neumann works as a placing agent with the Children’s Aid Society. Teamed up with placing agent Drew Brady, Marianne sets out on her first trip placing orphans with her secret hope of finding her younger sister, Sophie, who ran away.

Jody Hedlund weaves details of what the Orphan Trains were like for both the placing agents and the children in their care, helping the reader visualize the trips, the reception the children and agents often received in the towns they visited, and the emotions involved when the children were placed. And when they weren’t.

Along the journey, the relationship between Marianne and Drew grows until it is faced with a challenge when one boy they have not been able to place suggests the two of them marry, and adopt him as their son.

One of the things I enjoyed most while reading Together Forever was the easy banter between the two agents. It brought out their personality and often brought a smile to my face.

If you enjoy historical fiction, and are interested in learning more about the Orphan Trains in America, then Forever Together would be a good book to read.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”In Together Forever, Jody Hedlund’s second book in her Orphan Train series set in 1858, Marianne Newmann works as a placing agent with the Children’s Aid Society. Teamed up with placing agent Drew Brady, she sets out on her first trip placing orphans with the hope of finding her younger sister.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]