Three Things to Help Deal With Rejection

As an author I deal with rejection. Boy howdy. Do I ever. You may not be an author, but I believe it safe to say somewhere during your life, you have experienced the pain and awful sting of being rejected. If you can’t think of anything right off, perhaps you could go back in your mind to your early teen years. Yikes.

Maybe the rejection came from friends. Family. School. Work. Business endeavor. Church…Wherever it came from, it hurt.

In her book, Embraced, Lysa TerKuerst suggests three things to remember when we go through rejection of any kind. I’d like to share those with you today.

One rejection is not a projection of future failures.

Lysa says we need to acknowledge the hurt, but don’t see it as a permanent hindrance. Move on from the source of the rejection. Don’t let it shut you down in that arena of life. Don’t let it reach into your future.

There is usually some element of protection wrapped in every rejection.

Once we get past the rejection, we can look back and see how God allowed things to unfold the way they did for our protection. In his mercy, God allowed this.

This is a short-term setback, not a permanent condition.

The emotions that feel so intense today will ease up over time as long as we let them. If we give this rejection power to define us, it will haunt us long term. If we only allow it enough power to refine us, the hurt will give way to healing.

Did one of these three suggestions for when we go through rejection resonate with you over the others? Is there something you would add to help move past rejection?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

The good man does not escape all troubles—he has them too. But the Lord helps him in each and every one. Psalm 34:19 (TLB)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Our Identity

In one of the devotions in her book, Embraced, Lysa TerKeurst says when the heavens opened and God spoke at Christ’s baptism before his ministry began, God was well pleased with his Son. Jesus’ identity was in being God’s Son not in the great works he was about to accomplish.

Her point in saying this is just as God was pleased with his son before Christ began his earthly minister, God’s pleasure with us is not dependent on what we do.

Before we did a single thing for God, he was well pleased with us. Our identity is found in being a chosen Child of God. His son. His daughter.

Our identity is not found in the amount of good works we do.

It is not found in the number of times we say yes to a request of our time or resources for ministry.

Nor is it found in eloquent speech or Christian-sounding words.

In my present situation as a writer, I remind myself my identity is not found in the number of articles, devotions, blog posts, or novels I have or have not published.

My identity is not found in the number of writing awards I have or have not accumulated. It is not in the number of my followers nor is it in the size of my platform.

I would think in your life you have areas where you can say the same.

When we lean too far one direction in connecting our worth with our accomplishments, it can lead to pride. Lean too far the other direction, it can lead to discouragement.

Our identity is found in God and Christ alone.

God’s voice is the One we want to hear say he’s pleased with us. Sure. Having others say we’re on the right track and doing a good job is nice, but that’s not what defines us.

Do you find it difficult to separate how you view your worth from your works?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Then John agreed to his baptism. Jesus came straight out of the water afterwards, and suddenly the heavens opened and he saw the Spirit of God coming down like a dove and resting upon him. And a voice came out of Heaven saying, “This is my dearly-loved son, in whom I am well pleased.” Matthew 3:17 (Phillips)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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