Minding the Light Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Minding the Light by Suzanne Woods Fisher, the second book of her Nantucket Legacy series, is an historical novel set in 19th Century Nantucket Island, filled with characters to love and characters to despise. Within its pages you’ll find deception, treachery, hypocrisy, lies, and love as the story of Quaker Daphne Coffin and her brother-in-law, Captain Ren Macy is told.

One month after eloping with Daphne’s sister, Jane, Ren heads to sea in his whaling ship and is gone for six years. When he returns, his wife meets him on the dock with their six-year-old twins he knew nothing about. Then she collapses under questionable circumstances.

Woven throughout Minding the Light the author paints a picture of the people, faith, and town of Nantucket. She shows us their prejudice and hypocrisy along with their faithfulness and love.

Although this is the second in the series, and I never read the first book, I had no trouble figuring out who was who or what was going on.

The author includes both a Cast of Characters and Glossary page, and adds necessary information to eliminate confusion.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Revell provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

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Together Forever Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

In Together Forever, Jody Hedlund’s second book in her Orphan Train series set in 1858, Marianne Neumann works as a placing agent with the Children’s Aid Society. Teamed up with placing agent Drew Brady, Marianne sets out on her first trip placing orphans with her secret hope of finding her younger sister, Sophie, who ran away.

Jody Hedlund weaves details of what the Orphan Trains were like for both the placing agents and the children in their care, helping the reader visualize the trips, the reception the children and agents often received in the towns they visited, and the emotions involved when the children were placed. And when they weren’t.

Along the journey, the relationship between Marianne and Drew grows until it is faced with a challenge when one boy they have not been able to place suggests the two of them marry, and adopt him as their son.

One of the things I enjoyed most while reading Together Forever was the easy banter between the two agents. It brought out their personality and often brought a smile to my face.

If you enjoy historical fiction, and are interested in learning more about the Orphan Trains in America, then Forever Together would be a good book to read.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”In Together Forever, Jody Hedlund’s second book in her Orphan Train series set in 1858, Marianne Newmann works as a placing agent with the Children’s Aid Society. Teamed up with placing agent Drew Brady, she sets out on her first trip placing orphans with the hope of finding her younger sister.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

All She Left Behind Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

All She Left Behind, written by Jane Kirkpatrick, tells the story of Jennie Pickett in 1870s Oregon Territory. This book is filled with hope and disappointment. Love and betrayal. Courage and desperation. What I found most interesting with All She Left Behind is the way Jane Kirkpatrick wove her details into a compelling story based on the lives of real individuals.

Jennie wants to help people and uses her skill with herbs as one way to do that, hoping to turn that skill into a medical career. Trusting those closest to her proves costly, and deception sends Jennie on a path she wasn’t expecting to walk as she deals with the very real issue of alcoholism in her area and family.

Through to the final pages of All She Left Behind Jennie continues to follow her dream and refuses to give up.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below.

If you think others would appreciate reading this please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Revell provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

[bctt tweet=”All She Left Behind Book Review” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Mark of the King — Book Review

Mark of the Kingby Sandy Kirby Quandt

Jocelyn Green takes her cast of interesting characters on a journey of intrigue, treachery, secrets, hardship, and love in her latest book, Mark of the King. The story begins in Paris and swiftly moves to the swampland of Louisiana in the early 1720s.

Although there are parts in the book that were hauntingly disturbing for me to read, I believe Mark of the King is expertly written. The historical details vividly bring this period of time in Louisiana to life. You can almost feel the sticky sweat of the humid climate, the bite of the mosquitoes, and the mud sucking the shoes off your feet as you walk the streets of New Orleans. The characters are individuals you love right along with those you detest. They are complex with no simple answers to the question, Why?

As a midwife, Julianne has been convicted of the murder of one of her patients, branded with the fleur-de-lis; mark of the king, and sentenced to life in prison. Upon hearing the Company of the Indies is scouring prisons for convicts to colonize Louisiana, Julianne seeks a way to be one of those sent to America in the hopes of finding her younger brother Benjamin, a soldier in the king’s army.

What she isn’t told are the terms of the trip …  forced marriage to a fellow convict for the purpose of populating the untamed, unwelcoming colony.

French officer Marc-Paul Girard has information about Benjamin, but is what he tells Julianne the whole story?

At a time when the English and French fought against each other, and pitted Native Americans against one another for their own benefit, not everything nor everyone is what they seem, and loyalties are not what they appear.

If you are a fan of historical fiction, my recommendation is this … get your hands on Mark of the King and be transported to the New Orleans of the early 1720s.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below. If you think others would appreciate reading this please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Bethany House Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

One of my posts is scheduled to appear on Inspire a Fire February 7, 2017. Please stop by.

Faith – Book Review

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

If you enjoy reading Christian historical fiction with a hint of romance set during America’s Civil War, then Faith by Lyn Cote is the book for you. Faith, the third book in Lyn’s Quaker Bride series, follows Blessing and Honor.

Set in 1863, Faith follows Quakeress, Faith Cathwell, as she and her freeborn friend, Honroree, join a troop of General Grant’s Union soldiers in their campaign in the Western Theater as volunteer nurses. They hope traveling with the army will place them in a position to locate Honoree’s sister, Shiloh, also freeborn, who was kidnapped by slave catchers five years earlier.

Although they share differing views, as the months go by and the battles and war injuries continue, Faith reaches out to Colonel Devlin Knight for help in her search through Confederate territory for Shiloh .

Through the lives of her compelling cast of characters, Lyn Cote weaves a fascinating tale of love, honor, faith, and loss which I highly recommend.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on the subject. Leave a comment below. If you think others would appreciate reading this please share it through the social media buttons.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Tyndale House Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

One of my articles is scheduled to appear on Inspire a Fire April 5, 2016. Please stop by.