Suggestions to Fight a Blue Holiday

According to many studies, holidays increase feelings of loneliness and despair. The death of a loved one or unmet expectations of renewed happiness during the holidays are often sited as causes for feeling blue during the Christmas season. Throw in Seasonal Adjustment Disorder, and some of us may feel like we should hibernate until springtime.

Although not an all inclusive list, the following suggestions may help fight a blue holiday.

Watch holiday classics, sip hot chocolate, and eat Christmas cookies. Or skip the movie and just eat cookies. Watch a funny movie. Watch something uplifting. Watch The Princess Bride for the umpteenth time. Watch a musical, just not The King and I. The ending makes me cry every time.

If dealing with the break-up of a romantic relationship, stay away from the Hallmark Channel. Even if the guy gets the girl by the end of the movie, and maybe because the guy gets the girl by the end of the movie, those movies can make us feel lousy.

Read a good book. Try out a new creative outlet. Exercise. Go throw an axe.

Attend holiday events. Window shop. People-watch. Purchase something for someone in need. Volunteer for a worthy cause. Get in touch with a friend we haven’t spoken with for awhile.

Listen to music. Something I find especially helpful if I’m really in a funk, is listening to something snappy which sets my feet to tapping. Something I can warble out loud to. Avoid those beautiful ballads like, My Heart Will Go On, and The Way We Were, unless you really need to cry it out. If that’s the case, set a limit to how long you’ll give yourself to feel the pain.

Make new traditions if need be. Life is not static. It moves and flows with each breath we take. It’s okay to change things up a bit. If it doesn’t work, try something different.

What’s the best way you’ve found to help fight a blue holiday?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

I waited patiently for the Lord‘s help; then he listened to me and heard my cry. Psalm 40:1 (GNT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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When the Christmas Blues Hit

 

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

This time of year can be beastly for so many, for so many reasons.

It can be difficult to get through the festivities when we’re dealing with personal issues that drag us into a downward spiral. When we feel like crying and the scenes surround us are filled with happy, smiling people it can be rough. I understand. I truly do.

No matter where we might find ourselves right now, I believe God knows what we’re going through and is right there with us. If you’re struggling, please know I’m praying God’s peace which passes all understanding will surround and comfort you.

According to many studies holidays increase feelings of loneliness and despair. Christmas blues.

The reason can be because we’ve lost loved ones, or because our high expectations of renewed happiness during the holidays don’t materialize.

Throw in SAD, and some of us may feel like hibernating until springtime.

So, how do we manage to put one foot in front of the other during times when things just seem so wrong?

The following suggestions are by no means a thus sayeth. They are merely observations.

For one thing, stay away from the Hallmark and Lifetime Channels. Even if the guy gets the girl by the end of the movie, and maybe because the guy gets the girl, those movies more times than not, are depressing when we feel like everyone has a perfect life except us. Turn. Them. Off.

Go through your DVDs. Check out movies from your library. Watch something funny, something uplifting. Watch The Princess Bride for the umpteenth time. (Inconceivable!) Watch a musical, just not The King and I. The ending makes me cry every time.

Lose yourself in a mystery. How about Foyle’s War? If all else fails, what about viewing It’s a Wonderful Life, or The Christmas Story? (You’ll shoot your eye out!)

Go to free holiday events. Window shop. People-watch.

Purchase something within your budget for yourself.

Volunteer for a worthy cause.

Get in touch with a friend you haven’t spoken to for awhile.

Listen to music you enjoy.

One suggestion if you’re really in a funk, listen to something snappy that sets your feet tapping and you can warble out loud to. Avoid those beautiful ballads like,”My Heart Will Go On”, and “The Way We Were”, unless you really need to cry it out. If that’s the case, set a limit to how long you’ll give yourself to feel the pain.

Make new traditions if you need to. Life is not static. It moves and flows with each breath we take. It’s okay to change things up a bit. If it doesn’t work, try something different.

What’s the best way you know to get out of a funk?  Especially during the holidays.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under the heavens:

    a time to be born and a time to die,
    a time to plant and a time to uproot,
    a time to kill and a time to heal,
    a time to tear down and a time to build,
    a time to weep and a time to laugh,
    a time to mourn and a time to dance,
    a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them,
    a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing,
    a time to search and a time to give up,
    a time to keep and a time to throw away,
    a time to tear and a time to mend,
    a time to be silent and a time to speak,
    a time to love and a time to hate,
    a time for war and a time for peace. Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 (NIV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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