Sunday Scriptures — It’s Not a Trivial Pursuit

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Perhaps you’ve played the game, Trivial Pursuit, where winning is determined by a player’s ability to answer general knowledge and popular culture questions. The game’s popularity peaked in 1984, when over 20 million games were sold.

Many variations of the game exist in such places as board games, computer games, cards, and newspapers. Pie has a true knack for trivia. Ask him what the tallest building in Altamonte is, and he’s sure to tell you.

Trivial means “of little value or importance”. And while knowing obscure facts intrigues me and I love learning new things, I have enough trouble remembering the important things I need to remember, without adding those bits of information that hold little value.

At the time when Israel was divided into the Northern Kingdom of Israel and the Southern Kingdom of Judah, several kings played trivial pursuit of a different kind. They considered their sins trivial. Insignificant. Of little consequence or importance.

How very wrong they were.

Ahab became king of the Northern Kingdom after his father, Omri, died. About Omri the Bible says he “did evil in the eyes of the LORD and sinned more than all those before him.”

How would you like that to be your legacy?

Following in his father’s footsteps, however, the Bible says “Ahab son of Omri did more evil in the eyes of the LORD than any of those before him.”

Ahab considered it a trivial, insignificant thing to commit sins before God.

No matter how we sugar coat our sins and try to make them seem less wrong than someone else’s sins, all sins are against God. No sin is trivial or inconsequential. All sin must be repented of if we expect to be in the presence of a Holy God.

So. Did you play Trivial Pursuit? Do you like to discover trivial facts?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Omri rested with his ancestors and was buried in Samaria. And Ahab his son succeeded him as king.

In the thirty-eighth year of Asa king of Judah, Ahab son of Omri became king of Israel, and he reigned in Samaria over Israel twenty-two years. Ahab son of Omri did more evil in the eyes of the Lord than any of those before him. He not only considered it trivial to commit the sins of Jeroboam son of Nebat, but he also married Jezebel daughter of Ethbaal king of the Sidonians, and began to serve Baal and worship him. 1 Kings 16:28-31

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”No matter how we try to sugar coat it, no sin is trivial or inconsequential. All sin must be repented of if we expect to be in the presence of a Holy God. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — Some Trust in Chariots

By Sandy Kirby Quandt

In reading about the military battles of the Israelites throughout the Old Testament, one thing I have noticed is the reliance of many nations upon their military might and weaponry.

Many of these nations did not rely upon God. Those who relied on their own devices usually failed unless God was using their victory for his own purposes. Those who relied on God usually succeeded unless God was using their defeat as punishment.

Those who did not rely on God relied on their chariots and horses. They relied on their weapons of iron. They relied on their enormous numbers.

Time and again we see that God is not interested in chariots, weapons, or numbers.

King Ahab and King Jehoshaphat 2 Chronicles 18, David and Goliath 1 Samuel 17, and  Gideon Judges 7 are a few examples of this truth that come to mind.

Today we face armies that may seem to outnumber us. They may wield far superior weapons of iron while we carry a sling and five stones. They may be riding in chariots pulled by swift horses as we slug along on foot.

Doesn’t matter. What matters is that we have God on our side.

Whenever we feel as if we are fighting a difficult battle, whatever foe we may be up against, our hope of victory comes through the LORD.

Leave your comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Some trust in their war chariots and others in their horses,
but we trust in the power of the Lord our God.  Psalm 20:7 (GNT)

 I wish you well.

Sandy

Please sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.

Sunday Scriptures — God Will Have the Final Word

By Sandy Kirby Quandt

This post continues a previous thought I had about King Ahab, and how he didn’t want to listen to what the prophet Micaiah said, because Micaiah preached God’ truth. God’s truth was not what Ahab wanted to hear.

So, Ahab devised a scheme. He put his royal robes around King Jehoshaphat and sent him into battle.

The plan almost succeeded, but when Jehoshaphat saw he was under attack, he prayed to God.

I love, love, love what happened next.

A “random” arrow that wasn’t even aimed, struck King Ahab between the chinks of his armor, as he gloated over how clever he was to have escaped the enemy, and killed him.

God will have the final word. Make no mistake. His plans will not be thwarted.

Two kings. Two relationships with God. One king had faith in God and was obedient to him. One king disregarded God’s word and was disobedient. One king was saved. One king was not.

Just like Ahab and Jehoshaphat, we have a choice. We can listen to God, or ignore him. The choice is ours to make.

Leave your comments below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

So when they saw Jehoshaphat in his robe, they thought he was Ahab and started to attack him. But Jehoshaphat prayed, and the Lord made the Syrian soldiers stop. And when they realized he wasn’t Ahab, they left him alone. However, during the fighting a soldier shot an arrow without even aiming, and it hit Ahab between two pieces of his armor. He shouted to his chariot driver, “I’ve been hit! Get me out of here!”                                         2 Chronicles 18:31-33 (CEV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday.

One of my posts will appear on Inspire a Fire Tuesday, August 12, 2014. Please stop by and check it out.

Sunday Scriptures — I Don’t Like What He Says

Isaiah 40

King Ahab had a problem. He needed to know whether to attack Ramoth, or not. All the prophets he kept around him, told him what he wanted to hear. Sure. Go ahead and attack. You’ll win. Not…

But there was one prophet who spoke the truth as God lead him to speak it. Micaiah.

Because Micaiah spoke the truth, and not necessarily what Ahab wanted to hear, Ahab didn’t much like listening to the prophet.

Aren’t we like that sometimes? We keep people around us who tell us what we want to hear, regardless if it’s the truth or not. When we are told things we don’t like, we get mad. In Ahab’s case, he threw Micaiah into prison. You’ll find the rest of the story in 1 Kings 22:26-40.

It’s best to have Godly people around us, who will tell us the truth, even when we don’t want to hear it, than surround ourselves with those who just want to please.

What are your thoughts on the subject?

Ahab answered, “There is one more, Micaiah son of Imlah. But I hate him because he never prophesies anything good for me; it’s always something bad.”  1 Kings 22:8 (GNT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!