Bring Them Both

Have you ever read a passage of scripture in the Bible and found something you hadn’t noticed before?

For me it was the words bring them from Matthew’s account of Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem, the week before he died for the sins of the world on the cross of Calvary.

That was an A-ha moment.

There’s no telling how often I’ve either heard or read that passage. And never before did I noticed the word them.

Until now.

I remember Jesus sent the disciples to bring the colt he rode into Jerusalem, but this was the first time I noticed Jesus said bring them. Not one, but both. Mother and child.

Have you missed that too?

Jesus rode the colt. He had no need of the mother. Yet, he said to bring them both.

Now, to my maternal instinct I can understand why Jesus didn’t want to separate the two. What mother wants to be separated from her young child, no matter how noble the reason? I believe Jesus sympathized with the mother. He would not cause her or her child distress for his sake.

Bring them both.

Maybe she walked beside her young colt, kept an eye on him, and held her breath he wouldn’t stumble. Maybe she was led by one of the disciples, so she wouldn’t interfere. Maybe the mother told her colt to pay attention. This is Jesus, God’s son. Show him respect. Don’t go stepping in the mud puddles. Look sharp!

This whole idea of Jesus requesting both donkeys got me to thinking.

Jesus wants parents to bring their children to him. He wants children to bring their parents. He wants us to bring our co-workers. Our friends. Even our enemies.

Jesus told the disciples to bring them to him. Not just one donkey, but both. Not just the colt, but the parent also.

Just as he requested both animals, Jesus asks us to come to him and bring those we love along.

Sometimes that’s easier said than done.

Nevertheless, it is what Jesus requests.

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As Jesus and the disciples approached Jerusalem, they came to the town of Bethphage on the Mount of Olives. Jesus sent two of them on ahead. “Go into the village over there,” he said. “As soon as you enter it, you will see a donkey tied there, with its colt beside it. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone asks what you are doing, just say, ‘The Lord needs them,’ and he will immediately let you take them.” Matthew 21:1-3 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Sunday Scriptures – Palm Sunday

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

The Bible tells us Jesus wept. We understand that emotion when we read Jesus wept at his friend Lazarus’ death, but it seems strange to think of Jesus weeping right before his triumphal entry into Jerusalem on this day we celebrate as Palm Sunday.

Before all the hosannas and praise, Jesus wept because he knew what awaited the people who chose not to accept him as God’s son, and the peace he offered.

Christ’s three-year earthly ministry was rapidly coming to a close. In a few days Jesus would be arrested, tried illegally, and sentenced to die a horrific, tortuous death at the hands of sadistic men.

So on this Palm Sunday, let us sing our hosannas and praise the Savior who entered this world as a baby, lived a sinless life on this earth, became the Sacrificial Lamb who took the sins of the world upon himself, paid the debt we owed but could never pay with his life, rose victoriously from the grave, defeated hell, sin, Satan, and death, reigns eternally with the Father in heaven, and will return for those who accept Jesus’ invitation to claim him as God’s only son, King of kings and Lord of lords.

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As He approached Jerusalem, He saw the city and wept over it [and the spiritual ignorance of its people], saying, “If [only] you had known on this day [of salvation], even you, the things which make for peace [and on which peace depends]! But now they have been hidden from your eyes. For a time [of siege] is coming when your enemies will put up a barricade [with pointed stakes] against you, and surround you [with armies] and hem you in on every side, and they will level you to the ground, you [Jerusalem] and your children within you. They will not leave in you one stone on another, all because you did not [come progressively to] recognize [from observation and personal experience] the time of your visitation [when God was gracious toward you and offered you salvation].” Luke 19:41-44 (AMP)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Sunday Scriptures – Praise Him

Isaiahby Sandy Kirby Quandt

In Luke’s account of Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem, he mentioned something Jesus told the Pharisees which I’ve always found interesting.

Jesus sent two of his disciples ahead of the group to secure a colt for Jesus to ride into Jerusalem. He told the disciples if anyone should ask why they were taking the donkey to tell them simply, “The Lord needs it.” No other explanation was necessary.

The two did just as they were told and returned with the colt, threw their cloaks on it, and put Jesus on the animal. As he went along the road, people spread their own cloaks on the road and joyfully shouted praise to God in loud voices for all the miracles they had seen Jesus perform.

This praising disturbed the Pharisees. A lot of things concerning Jesus disturbed the Pharisees, actually, but at this particular point in time, the people’s praise bothered them greatly. They told Jesus to quiet his followers.

And here’s the part I love best …

In reply to their request, Jesus simply told the Pharisees even if his followers were quiet, the rocks and stones themselves would cry out their praises to him.

Jesus the Son was with God the Father and the Holy Spirit when the earth was created. Those rocks and stones which lined the road into Jerusalem KNEW who Jesus was. The Creator. The only one worthy of praise. He was the King who came in the name of the Lord. And if the humans who lined the road refused to shout their praise to the Lord, the rocks would. Creation will praise its Creator.

Do we look for God’s hand in the world around us and praise him? Do we see each sunrise and sunset as the work of the Master and praise him? Do we ache to shout our praises to the Lord for everything he has done, is doing, and will do in our lives?

Don’t you think if the rocks and stones know enough to praise Jesus, we should as well?

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When he came near the place where the road goes down the Mount of Olives, the whole crowd of disciples began joyfully to praise God in loud voices for all the miracles they had seen:

 “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!”

“Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!”

Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Jesus, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples!”

 “I tell you,” he replied, “if they keep quiet, the stones will cry out.” Luke 19:37-40 (NIV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Sunday Scriptures — God Has Given Us a King

Isaiah 40We call the day Palm Sunday. The day Jesus Christ rode triumphantly into the town of Jerusalem. The city of Peace. People lined the streets. They spread palm branches and their cloaks on the road before their long-awaited king.

The shouts of hosanna rang through the air. Glory to God echoed off the city walls.

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? Thirty-three years earlier, a heavenly host of angels sang their praises of glory to the God on High. The One who sent his son, Jesus, as a baby to be born among man. The creator sent to live among his creation. Sent to earth so he could understand our trials, pains, triumphs and glories. So he could sympathize with us as a High Priest, and to ultimately offer his own life as a sacrifice for the forgiveness of our sins.

But not today. Not this day. On this day, the crowds worshiped Jesus as King. When the Jewish religious leaders, the Pharisees, got hot under the collar about all the praising, they told Jesus to hush the people up.

I love Jesus’ reply…“I tell you that if they kept quiet, the very stones in the road would burst out cheering!” (Luke 19:40 Phillips) Yea, God!

The rocks and stones, themselves, would rise up and praise Jesus! YES!

What say we add our voices to the songs of the rocks, and not leave it to them to praise our King?

What are your thoughts on the subject?

And as he rode along, the people spread clothes on the road in front of him. When Jesus was starting down the Mount of Olives, his large crowd of disciples were happy and praised God because of all the miracles they had seen. They shouted, “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory to God.”  Luke 19:36-38 (CEV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Tomorrow, April 7, 2014, I’ll be a guest blogger on The Most Important Thing. Hope you stop by.

Pierced For Our Transgressions

This past Sunday, Palm Sunday, we celebrated Jesus Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Crowds lined the road. They shouted out their hosannas and praises, as Jesus passed by. Yet, within five short days, those praises turned to condemnation.

Crucify him! Crucify him! Crucify him!

Although Pilate could find no wrong in Jesus, he capitulated to the crowd’s demands. Pilate handed Christ over to be murdered. After that, Pilate washed his hands of Christ’s innocent blood.

Jesus was the sacrificial Lamb of God. He took the punishment mankind’s sins deserved, upon himself. His sacrifice allows us entrance into the very presence of God. By Jesus Christ’s suffering and death, our sins were forgiven.

When we were unable to help ourselves, at the right time, Christ died for us, although we were living against God. Very few people will die to save the life of someone else. Although perhaps for a good person someone might possibly die. But God shows his great love for us in this way: Christ died for us while we were still sinners. So through Christ we will surely be saved from God’s anger, because we have been made right with God by the blood of Christ’s death. While we were God’s enemies, he made us his friends through the death of his Son. Surely, now that we are his friends, he will save us through his Son’s life. And not only that, but now we are also very happy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through him we are now God’s friends again. Romans 5:6-11 New Century Version

A trauma surgeon medically describes the effect crucifixion would have on the human body, in this video by Central Christian Church, in Wichita, KS.

He who knew no sin, took on the sins of the world, that by His wounds, we can be healed. Perfect Love.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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