Sunday Scriptures — The King’s Table

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

After David became king of the united tribes of Israel, he wondered if any of Saul’s family remained he could show kindness. That in itself was a shock to those who understood how the succession to a throne usually went.

No new king looked for his rival’s family members to show them kindness. They looked for family members to eliminate.

You see, David made a promise to one of Saul’s sons, Jonathan. He and David were best buds. Jonathan knew God choose David over him to become king when Saul died. He didn’t try to get in the way of God’s plan. In fact, Jonathan risked his life at the hands of his father’s wrath to protect David. Because of that, David was determined to keep his promise to protect Jonathan’s family.

As it turned out, there was a son of Jonathan’s, Mephibosheth, still alive. David sent for Mephibosheth. Understandably, when he arrived at the palace in front of the king, Mephibosheth expected the worse. As he had every right to expect.

But David told him not to be afraid. He wanted to show kindness to Mephibosheth because of his friendship with Jonathan. He restored everything that belonged to Mephibosheth’s grandfather, Saul, and told Mephibosheth from that day forward, he would live in David’s palace and eat at the king’s table as if he were one of David’s sons.

Amazing.

When I think of this story, which I absolutely love, I connect the image of Mephibosheth eating at the king’s table, with The King’s table which is prepared for us by our Good Shepherd, Jesus Christ. Our Shepherd prepares a table before us in the presence of our enemies.

I imagine sitting at the king’s table, and eating with David’s sons, made Mephibosheth believe he sat in the presence of his enemies. I doubt David’s sons, especially Absolom and Amnon, were pleased to have Saul’s grandson treated like one of them.

What others thought didn’t matter. David was king. He invited Mephibosheth to eat at his table, and Mephibosheth would eat at the king’s table.

We have a place at the table Jesus prepares for us. He is King. He’s the one in charge. If he believes us worthy enough to eat in his presence, no enemy can keep us from pulling up a seat.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

“Don’t be afraid!” David said. “I intend to show kindness to you because of my promise to your father, Jonathan. I will give you all the property that once belonged to your grandfather Saul, and you will eat here with me at the king’s table!” 2 Samuel 9:7 (NLT)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”After David became king of the united tribes of Israel, he wondered if any of Saul’s family remained he could show kindness.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — Who Is Your Neighbor?

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Today’s Sunday Scriptures post, Simple Truth, is written by my writer-friend, Phyllis Farringer.

I don’t remember her name. I don’t remember if I even knew it, actually. The details of a decades-old event have receded to a dusty, untended memory shelf. We occupied a waiting room at the Presidio Army hospital, both awaiting surgical outcomes. A year into our marriage, my husband needed major kidney surgery. Far from family, and miles from the Air Force Radar Site where he was stationed, I was alone. I was 19, self-absorbed, and scared. Would he lose a kidney? Would he die?

She had a young son in open-heart surgery. I don’t know why her husband wasn’t with her. We were at a military hospital. It is likely he had been deployed somewhere. I don’t know because I never asked.

What I do remember is her kindness. While she had to be concerned about her son’s serious surgery, she displayed only peace and a serene, confident spirit. She asked me about my husband. She reassured me the doctors at the Presidio were some of the best anywhere. She got coffee for me. She kept me from feeling alone. She may have spoken about God being in charge, but I’m not sure. Just her presence helped me get through the long wait.

After several hours, surgery over, the doctor assured me all was well and I could see my husband. I left the waiting room and never followed up with the woman about her son. She had lavished kindness on me and received nothing in return.

In Luke 10, Jesus was asked by an expert in the law what he must do to inherit eternal life. Jesus asked this expert to tell Him what he already knew about that from Scripture. He knew he was to love God with all his heart and love his neighbor as himself. Jesus told him his knowledge was correct. What he needed to do was live it.

The lawyer wanted to justify himself. He asked, “Who is my neighbor?”

As is often the case, Jesus didn’t answer the question that was asked; He answered the question that should have been asked: “How do we do that?” Through the parable of the Good Samaritan, He teaches us not to try to decide for whom we may or may not be responsible, but instead to be a neighbor to whomever in our path is in need.

Long ago, a stranger showed mercy and compassion to me in my need. At the time, I could have quoted the Greatest Commandment and I knew about the Good Samaritan. The difference between us then was that she was living it out. Even now, the Lord is using her example to help me understand what He is teaching me.

Phyllis Farringer delights in proclaiming God’s goodness. Her work has appeared in various periodicals including Decision Magazine, Focus on the Family publications, and Christianity Today Bible Studies. She has also written for several compilations including Cup of Comfort for Moms and God Allows U-Turns. She and her husband live in North Carolina. They have two married children and seven grandchildren.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

(Jesus said,) “Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.” Luke 10:36-37 (NIV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”Jesus teaches us not to try to decide for whom we may or may not be responsible, but instead to be a neighbor to whomever in our path is in need. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — Misaligned

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Ever since new progressive lenses were placed in my eyeglasses six months ago, I haven’t been able to see clearly through them, no matter how I try to adjust them on my face. Rather frustrating.

At my most recent eye exam I again mentioned the problem. Because the prescription is correct, a tech in the optical department made sure the lines of the progressives were aligned correctly. They were not. They were misaligned. Off my a milli-fraction.

New lenses were ordered and she aligned them herself.

Yay!

The problem may have been barely discernable and the misalignment minute, but it affected my vision nonetheless.

Whenever I think of people in the Bible with misaligned vision of who Jesus was, I think of the Pharisees. Their vision was not off by a fraction. It was off by a mile. And then some.

The Pharisees believed they knew everything and interpreted the biblical laws correctly. They were so very wrong.

Sometimes we might do the same thing. We might rely on past understanding of scripture or what someone told us, without studying to see if what we’ve held as truth is actually true; believing we are fully aligned with the Scriptures.

We need to check to make sure our understanding of Scripture is aligned with what God says. If it isn’t, even if only off by a milli-fraction, it’s misaligned just as surely as my lenses were and needs corrected.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

All Scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching, for showing people what is wrong in their lives, for correcting faults, and for teaching how to live right.  2 Timothy 3:16 (NCV)

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”We need to check to make sure our understanding of Scripture is aligned with what God says. If not, it’s misaligned and needs corrected. ” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — Simple Truth

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

Today’s Sunday Scriptures post, Simple Truth, is written by my writer-friend, Phyllis Farringer.

The Pharisees translated all of God’s commandments into a system of rules – rules for righteousness. As they checked off the things on their lists, they fooled themselves into believing they were righteous. They missed the whole point of the Law. The commandments teach us how to live in ways that please God, but they can’t make us righteous. The purpose of the Law was not to make us righteous, but to reveal that we are not. No matter how good we try to be, we fall short of God’s perfect standard (Romans 3:23; James 2:10).

Rules can’t save us. God placed Adam and Eve in a perfect environment and gave them one restriction – one rule to follow. It evidently wasn’t long before they replaced God’s rule with their own (Genesis 2, 3). Every person since – each one of us – has repeated our own version of their story. That’s why Jesus came. We need a Savior. God knew from the beginning we needed Jesus. Jesus gave human shape to all the grace and truth and goodness of God’s character. Jesus paid the penalty for our inability and unwillingness to obey the requirements God rightfully expects of each one of us.

How great and gracious God is. All of human history is a record of His faithfulness amidst our unfaithfulness. That is the essence of what the Bible teaches from Genesis to Revelation. If we think we can do enough good in order to be good enough, we deceive ourselves. We need a Savior. We are incapable of attaining righteousness and a right relationship with our Creator without help. The real ‘work’ God requires of us is to believe in Jesus (John 6:28,29). Once we put our faith in Jesus, we demonstrate our love for Him by our obedience to his teaching (John 14:21).

Jesus summed it up even more simply. He told us to love God and love our neighbor. If we just do that, it takes care of all the other requirements. But if we are honest with ourselves, we know we don’t do that. We can’t do that perfectly. Pride, selfishness, self-centeredness, ambitions, and mountains of other things, get in the way of loving God and loving others as we should. Once we recognize that, He can work on our hearts. It is the condition of our hearts that matters to God.

God is patient with us. He wants us to get it right. Outward behavior, though important, is not enough to make us right with God. The commandments teach us how to live, but really, once we put our faith in Jesus, the key to living righteously is to learn to love better.

Phyllis Farringer delights in proclaiming God’s goodness. Her work has appeared in various periodicals including Decision Magazine, Focus on the Family publications, and Christianity Today Bible Studies. She has also written for several compilations including Cup of Comfort for Moms and God Allows U-Turns. She and her husband live in North Carolina. They have two married children and seven grandchildren.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Jesus replied: “ ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all you soul and with all your mind. This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.” Matthew 22:37-40

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”Today’s Sunday Scriptures post, Simple Truth, is written by my writer-friend, Phyllis Farringer.” username=”SandyKQuandt”]

Sunday Scriptures — Pray For Our Pastors

by Sandy Kirby Quandt

How often do we pray for our pastors? Daily? Weekly? Rarely? Never?

Those God calls as shepherds over his flock have a big job. Hopefully, they preach the truth found in God’s Holy Word, encourage us, lead us, pray for us, correct us when necessary, plus a multitude of other things depending on the collective of believers they minister to and with. Things we often have no idea they do. And truthfully do not need to know they do.

Along with shepherding the members of their congregation, many also have families to raise and be there for.

If we consider the different people in the seats around us each week, there may be those whose personalities grate on us right along with personalities that mesh with ours.

Imagine what it must be like for a pastor. They come in contact with many of us throughout the week, not only during weekly worship time. If not in person, I believe it would be safe to say they receive phone calls or emails. Many of which I doubt are encouraging or uplifting.

Perhaps I’m being cynical. Perhaps all the words sent their way, and about them, are encouraging and uplifting. I’m not a pastor, nor am I married to one, so I don’t have firsthand insight. But I think I know a little bit about how people act. I know how I act.

We can be downright mean. Our default seems set on finding fault, questioning decisions made by leadership, being critical, and feeling slighted.

So I’m wondering … what would our churches look like if each person; everyone of us, committed to earnestly pray for our pastors daily?

Do you think it would make a difference not only in the life of our pastors, but in the life of our church, and yes, even in us?

What say ye, should we give it a go and find out?

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

Finally, dear brothers, as I come to the end of this letter, I ask you to pray for us. Pray first that the Lord’s message will spread rapidly and triumph wherever it goes, winning converts everywhere as it did when it came to you. 2 Thessalonians 3:1

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

[bctt tweet=”So I’m wondering … what would our churches look like if each person; everyone of us, committed to earnestly pray for our pastors daily?” username=”SandyKQuandt”]