Gluten-free Cabbage Patch Stew Recipe

I adapted this yummy gluten-free Cabbage Patch Stew recipe from Blind Pig and the Acorn. Pilot made dumplings to go with it, but we decided it’s better without them.

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups coarsely chopped cabbage
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 16 oz stewed tomatoes
  • 15 1/2 oz kidney, OR black beans
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 teaspoons chili powder

Cook and stir ground beef in Dutch oven until brown. Drain

Add onions, cabbage, and celery. Cook and stir until vegetables are light brown.

Stir in tomatoes, beans (with liquid), water, salt, pepper, and chili powder.

Heat to boiling. Reduce heat.

Cook uncovered over low heat 10 minutes.

Cover and cook an additional 10 minutes.

Enjoy!

You can find my August Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Guest Post – I Am Gideon

Today’s guest post, I Am Gideon, written by Dave Peever first appeared on Live 4 Him.

I Am Gideon

Oh how I love this name! When you say it, it just rolls off the tongue without effort and yet it seems to be less poetic and more powerful. Okay enough of my silly musings about the name Gideon. As much as I like it I am not changing my name to Gideon nor am I asking that my grandchildren bear this awesome name that I have fallen in love with. If the name was Bob, a name so simple it can be spelt backward and still be the same (sorry to all the Bobs out there) I would say I am Bob just as I have said in past posts, I am Paul, Mary, Thomas, Samuel, Peter, Adam, Judas, The Rich Young Ruler and  Coca- Cola™ because a part of me is just like Bob, I mean Gideon.

I have been called to fulfill God’s plan.

The call was unmistakable and my response, well, let’s just say it was more like Gideon’s.

Gideon replied, “If now I have found favor in your eyes, give me a sign that it is really you talking to me… Judges 6:17(NIV)

I heard God’s call, or at least what I thought was God’s call. It wasn’t as much that I was afraid to live out the call or to step out in faith. My fear stemmed from my understanding of me. I was afraid that I would jump at any chance to do ministry especially one that included music and theatre because I love doing music and theatre and now I could be doing it for God who I also love! Mix what I want to happen with a perceived call from God and I am all over it. To avoid godizing my dreams I asked for a sign. I am Gideon.

If this is what you want me to do…

I have questioned God and I continue to do it to this day. I have heard that it is wrong and I guess you could, in a perfect world, with perfect people, argue that once God has spoken there is no room for questioning. I am not in a perfect world and I am far from perfect. There have been times that God has spoken and I have acted without question. In these cases it was clear that my personal desires were not creating the appearance of God instructing me to pursue an action and my fears and the reality of the situation were not calling into question what I thought I heard. Outside of this situation, I am Gideon.

I think Gideon gets a bad rap.

It isn’t because I think I am like Gideon. I am not trying to defend him and therefore defend me. I believe that Gideon had it right even if he took a long time to come around. If you put yourself in his shoes maybe you would have trouble believing that you had a call from God and a visit from one of his angels.

Gideon, just as the rest of the Israelites, had a deep desire to be rescued from captivity.

Midian so impoverished the Israelites that they cried out to the Lord for help. Judges 6:6 (NIV)

Gideon couldn’t fathom God using him in a mighty way.

The Lord turned to him and said, “Go in the strength you have and save Israel out of Midian’s hand. Am I not sending you?”

“Pardon me, my lord,” Gideon replied, “but how can I save Israel? My clan is the weakest in Manasseh, and I am the least in my family.” Judges 6:14-15 (NIV)

Gideon fought his own doubts and needed God’s assurance.

 Gideon said to God, “If you will save Israel by my hand as you have promised— look, I will place a wool fleece on the threshing floor. If there is dew only on the fleece and all the ground is dry, then I will know that you will save Israel by my hand, as you said.” And that is what happened. Gideon rose early the next day; he squeezed the fleece and wrung out the dew—a bowlful of water.

Then Gideon said to God, “Do not be angry with me. Let me make just one more request. Allow me one more test with the fleece, but this time make the fleece dry and let the ground be covered with dew.” That night God did so. Only the fleece was dry; all the ground was covered with dew. Judges 6:36-40 (NIV)

I am Gideon and before you judge me hear me out.

I am imperfect and weak, capable of acting or not acting based on my own desires and fears. I’d rather question God over and over again because I am not sure I have heard Him right than wrongly assume I have heard Him correctly because I don’t want to question Him over and over again.

Who is Dave Peever? I am a follower of Jesus the Christ. My specific call is to creatively present various aspects of life as a Christ follower and as a member of a collective of Christ followers I use my background as an actor, director and playwright/writer as well as my music, preaching and leadership skills to assist churches in transition (between pastors) with their desire to be more effective. I have been married for 31 years. We have 3 sons and 4 grandchildren all who currently reside in central Ontario Canada. I have been in ministry for 22 years.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

You can find my July Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks!

Our Choice

Whatever the circumstance, each of us chooses how we will respond. We can respond in anger or we can respond in humility. Our response can inflame a tense situation or it can restore calm. We can use our words to bring peace or bring chaos. We can make excuses or face the truth of our part in the situation.

It’s our choice.

Too many times I haven’t taken the time to consider the best way to respond in each circumstance that presented itself. I’ve excused my behavior often with words like, “It’s his fault. He’s just a big dodo bird.” “If she wasn’t so annoying I wouldn’t get mad.” “It isn’t fair. Why do I have to say I’m sorry first?” And no. These are not just phrases  from my younger days. Unfortunately.

I’ve been hurt by harsh words and intentional slights, as I’m sure most of you have. And that’s where we go back to the fact how we respond is our choice. We can respond in kind, inflicting as much or more pain as was inflicted upon us, or respond as Scripture points out we should respond. In love, patience, kindness, gentleness…

Today I’m looking at the relationship between Saul and David to see what we can learn from how David choose to respond.

After King Saul threw a spear at David’s head one too many times, David fled into the night to escape the madness. For over ten years, David ran and Saul pursued. Saul’s men and resources certainly could have been used in better ways. Like fighting the Philistines instead of spending energy chasing a loyal subject all around Israel and slaughtering innocent priests.

Many of David’s psalms were written during this time of pursuit. Even though David called upon God to deal swiftly with his enemies, when it came to Saul, David himself never lifted his hand against the man. He mourned deeply when Saul died and instructed the nation to mourn as well.

There are two incidences during David’s time on the run where he had the opportunity to kill Saul and didn’t. One involved a piece of cloth cut from the corner of Saul’s robe. (1 Samuel 24) The other a spear and water jug. (1 Samuel 26) Both times David showed restraint. He had the upper hand but refused to take advantage of the situation. He could have pressed his advantage, proven himself superior, and scored points with his men. Still, he took the higher ground and responded in humility and love.

Although we may not be presented with opportunities to physically harm our enemy, I believe it’s safe to say we’ve been presented with times to choose whether or not we harm someone just as surely with our careless words. As with David, just because we have the opportunity to do harm doesn’t mean we should.

It’s easy to take offense and seek revenge when others attack us. Are you kidding me? That’s usually our primary desire. Instead of striking out, we can pause, keep our eyes focused on Jesus, and pray for the strength to respond in humility and love. It’s our choice.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

But then a black mood from God settled over Saul and took control of him. He was sitting at home, his spear in his hand, while David was playing music. Suddenly, Saul tried to skewer David with his spear, but David ducked. The spear stuck in the wall and David got away. It was night.

1 Samuel 19:9-10 (MSG)

You can find my July Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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Pause for Poetry – At Eventime

At Eventime

James Arnold Blaisdell

Riches of Grace a Collection of New Songs and Standard Hymns‎ page 105

Tonight, my soul, be still and sleep;

The storms are raging on God’s deep–

God’s deep, not yours; be still and sleep.

Tonight, my soul, be still and sleep;

God’s hands shall still the Tempter’s sweep–

God’s hands, not yours; be still and sleep.

Tonight, my soul, be still and sleep;

God’s love is strong while night hours creep–

God’s love, not yours; be still and sleep.

Tonight, my soul, be still and sleep;

God’s heaven will comfort those who weep–

God’s heaven, not yours; be still and sleep.

Leave a comment below to share your thoughts on the subject. If you think others would appreciate reading this, please share it through the social media buttons.

You can find my July Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

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An Appalachian Summer Book Review

An Appalachian Summer by Ann H. Gabhart, set in Appalachian Kentucky during the Depression of 1933, is a wonderful book filled with relatable characters who face challenges without giving up.

Piper Danson is faced with deciding whether she should go along with her father’s decision she marry a man she’s not met before to secure her financial future, or marry the man she has loved since they were children with little prospect of financial support.

To give herself time and space to think without either of the men around, Piper leaves her home with all its comforts in Louisville to volunteer as a Frontier Nursing horseback courier in the mountains where comforts as she’s known them are replaced with an awareness of God’s beauty and presence.

An Appalachian Summer skillfully draws readers into the world of the Frontier Nurses, the couriers, and the people of the mountains, presenting each as an individual with hopes, dreams, needs, and resilience.

I highly recommend this book for those who want to read a heartfelt story well told.

Have you read this book? If so, what was your impression of it?

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell for a fair and honest review, which is exactly what I gave.

You can find my July Inspire a Fire post here. Please stop by and read it.

I wish you well.

Sandy

Please enter your email address on the form located on the right sidebar to sign up to receive posts every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks.